Cardiorespiratory Fitness Predicts Higher Inhibitory Control in Patients With Substance Use Disorder

in Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology
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  • 1 Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte
  • 2 Swansea University
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Impaired inhibitory control has been shown in individuals with substance use disorder (SUD). Cardiorespiratory fitness has been described as a potential factor to improve inhibitory control; however, the benefits in individuals with SUD are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness with general and drug-specific inhibitory control in individuals with SUD. Sixty-two male participants under treatment for SUD performed a general and drug-specific inhibitory control test (go/no-go) and a cardiorespiratory fitness test. Cardiorespiratory fitness, age, and years of drug use were inversely associated with reaction time for both general and drug-specific inhibitory control. In addition, the regression models showed that cardiorespiratory fitness predicts general and drug-specific inhibitory control adjusted for age and time of drug use. However, cardiorespiratory fitness predicts equally both general and drug-specific inhibitory control. These findings suggest that increasing cardiorespiratory fitness could provide benefits in the inhibitory function of individuals with SUD.

Tavares, da Costa, Cabral, Rego, and Fontes are with NEUROex—Research Group in Physical Activity, Cognition and Behavior, Health Science Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal/RN, Brazil. Price is with the Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom.

Fontes (eduardobfontes@gmail.com) is corresponding author.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Material (pdf 372 KB)