Differences in Preschool Boys’ and Girls’ Overhand Throwing Practice Behaviors During a Mastery Motivational Climate

in Journal of Motor Learning and Development
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  • 1 The Ohio State University
  • 2 Auburn University
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The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which preschool boys’ and girls’ gender and skill level relate to their throwing practice behaviors during a mastery motivational climate intervention. Fifty-four preschool children (24 boys, 30 girls) participated in a 7-week FMS intervention. Children’s practice behaviors (number of visits, total time, and total trials) at the overhand throwing station were video recorded during each session. A series of unpaired Welch assessments were run to determine if there were differences in practice behaviors across the intervention based on gender and initial skill level. Results indicated significant differences in practice time and trials based on gender and skill level, but no differences in the number of visits. It appears that throwing gender stereotypes perhaps may be related to practice behaviors for young children. Interventions should consider ways to make throwing more enticing for young girls and less skilled children to encourage practice and enhance learning.

Johnson is with the Department of Human Sciences and the Department of Kinesiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. Hastie, Rudisill, and Wadsworth are with the School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.

Johnson (johnson.8636@osu.edu) is corresponding author.
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