The Stryd Foot Pod Is a Valid Measure of Stepping Cadence During Treadmill Walking and Running

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Madeline E. Shivgulam Division of Kinesiology, School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

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Jennifer L. Petterson Division of Kinesiology, School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6534-2744
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Liam P. Pellerine Division of Kinesiology, School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

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Derek S. Kimmerly Division of Kinesiology, School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

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Myles W. O’Brien Division of Kinesiology, School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

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Stepping cadence is an important determinant of activity intensity, with faster stepping associated with the most health benefits. The Stryd monitor provides real-time feedback on stepping cadence. The limited existing literature has neither validated the Stryd across slow walking to fast running speeds nor strictly followed statistical guidelines for monitor validation studies. We assessed the criterion validity of the Stryd monitor to detect stepping cadence across multiple walking and jogging/running speeds. It was hypothesized that the Stryd monitor would be an accurate measure of stepping cadence across all measured speeds. Forty-six participants (23 ± 5 years, 26 females) wore the Stryd monitor on their shoelaces during a 10-stage progressive treadmill walking (Speeds 1–5) and jogging/running (Speeds 6–10) protocol (criterion: manually counted video-recorded cadence; total stages: 438). Standardized guidelines for physical activity monitor statistical analyses were followed. A two-way repeated-measure analysis of variance revealed the Stryd monitor recorded a slightly higher cadence (<1 steps/min difference, all p < .001) at 2 miles/hr (92.1 ± 6.2 steps/min vs. 91.5 ± 6.4 steps/min, p < .001), 2.5 miles/hr (101.3 ± 6.1 steps/min vs. 100.7 ± 6.4 steps/min), and 3.5 miles/hr (117.4 ± 5.9 steps/min vs. 117.0 ± 6.0 steps/min). However, equivalence testing demonstrated high equivalence of the Stryd and manually counted cadence (equivalence zone required: ≤± 2.6%) across all speeds. The Stryd activity monitor is a valid measure of stepping cadence across walking, jogging, and running speeds. By providing real-time cadence feedback, the Stryd monitor has strong potential to help guide the general public monitor their stepping intensity to promote more habitual activity at faster cadences.

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