Relationship of Weekly Activity Minutes to Metabolic Syndrome in Prediabetes: The Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

Physical inactivity contributes to metabolic syndrome (MetS) in overweight/obesity. However, little is known about this relationship in prediabetes.

Methods:

The study purpose is to examine relationships between physical activity (PA) and MetS in prediabetes. The Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes tested a community translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Three hundred one overweight/obese prediabetics provided walking minutes/week (WM) and total activity minutes/week (AM) via the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. MetS was at least 3 of waist (men ≥ 102 cm, women ≥ 88 cm), triglycerides (≥150 mg·dl), blood pressure (≥130·85 mm Hg), glucose (≥100mg·dl), and HDL (men < 40mg·dl, women < 50mg·dl).

Results:

The sample was 57.5% female, 26.7% nonwhite/Hispanic, 57.9 ± 9.5 years and had a body mass index (BMI) 32.7 ± 4 kg·m2. Sixty percent had MetS. Eighteen percent with MetS reported at least 150 AM compared with 29.8% of those without MetS. The odds of MetS was lower with greater AM (Ptrend = .041) and WM (Ptrend = .024). Odds of MetS with 0 WM were 2.08 (P = .046) and with no AM were 2.78 (P = .009) times those meeting goal. One hour additional WM led to 15 times lower MetS odds.

Conclusions:

Meeting PA goals reduced MetS odds in this sample, which supported PA for prediabetes to prevent MetS.

Rosenberger Hale and Blackwell are with the Dept of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC. Goff is Dean of the Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO. Isom is with the Dept of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC. Whitt-Glover is with Gramercy Research Group, Winston Salem, NC. Katula is with the Dept of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC.