Individual, Psychosocial, and Environmental Correlates of 4-Year Declines in Walking Among Middle-to-Older Aged Adults

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

We examined associations of individual, psychosocial and environmental characteristics with 4-year changes in walking among middle-to-older aged adults; few such studies have employed prospective designs.

Methods:

Walking for transport and walking for recreation were assessed during 2003–2004 (baseline) and 2007–2008 (follow-up) among 445 adults aged 50–65 years residing in Adelaide, Australia. Logistic regression analyses examined predictors of being in the highest quintile of decline in walking (21.4 minutes/day or more reduction in walking for transport; 18.6 minutes/day or more reduction in walking for recreation).

Results:

Declines in walking for transport were related to higher level of walking at baseline, low perceived benefits of activity, low family social support, a medium level of social interaction, low sense of community, and higher neighborhood walkability. Declines in walking for recreation were related to higher level of walking at baseline, low self-efficacy for activity, low family social support, and a medium level of available walking facilities.

Conclusions:

Declines in middle-to-older aged adults’ walking for transport and walking for recreation have differing personal, psychosocial and built-environment correlates, for which particular preventive strategies may be developed. Targeted campaigns, community-based programs, and environmental and policy initiatives can be informed by these findings.

Shimura (shimura@p.u-tokyo.ac.jp) is with the Dept of Physical and Health Education, Graduate School of Education, Tokyo, Japan. Winkler is with the Cancer Prevention Research Centre, School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Owen is with the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.