In-Classroom Physical Activity and Its Impact on Physical Activity Outside of School in a Hispanic Community

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health

Click name to view affiliation

Dana Sirota
Search for other papers by Dana Sirota in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Dodi Meyer
Search for other papers by Dodi Meyer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Andres Nieto
Search for other papers by Andres Nieto in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Arlen Zamula
Search for other papers by Arlen Zamula in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Melissa Stockwell
Search for other papers by Melissa Stockwell in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Evelyn Berger-Jenkins
Search for other papers by Evelyn Berger-Jenkins in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Background:

School-based physical activity programs can reach large populations of at-risk children however evidence for the sustainability of healthy behaviors as a result of these programs is mixed. Healthy Schools Healthy Families (HSHF) is a physical activity and nutrition program for elementary students in a predominantly minority community. The program includes short teacher led classroom-based physical activities, also known as Transition Exercises (TE). Our aim was to assess whether TE was associated with children’s reported recreational physical activity outside of school.

Methods:

We surveyed HSHF students in grade 5 (n = 383) about their recreational physical activity at the start and end of the school year. Multivariable analysis was used to determine what factors including TE contributed to their reported activity.

Results:

Students were predominantly Hispanic with a mean age of 10 ± .03. There was an increase in reported recreational physical activity from the start to the end of the school year (73.6% to 82.4%, P < .05). Students who participated in more TE had a 2.75 times greater odds of reporting participation in recreational activity than students who participated in less TE.

Conclusions:

For students in HSHF, TE was significantly associated with an increase in recreational physical activity.

Sirota (drs2146@columbia.edu), Meyer, Zamula, Stockwell, and Berger-Jenkins are with the Dept of Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York City, NY. Nieto is with the Dept of Community Health Outreach and Marketing, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York City, NY.

  • Collapse
  • Expand