Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Depressive Symptoms Among Latinos: Does Use of Community Resources for Physical Activity Matter?

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

Greater neighborhood social cohesion is linked to fewer depressive symptoms and greater physical activity, but the role of physical activity on the relationship between neighborhood social cohesion and depression is poorly understood. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of physical activity on the association between neighborhood social cohesion and depressive symptoms.

Methods:

Multivariate logistic regression tested the moderation of self-reported leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (LTMVPA) and active use of parks or recreational facilities on the association between neighborhood social cohesion and depressive symptoms among 295 randomly selected Latino adults who completed a face-to-face interview.

Results:

After adjusting for age, gender, and income, neighborhood social cohesion and depressive symptoms were inversely related (OR = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.5–1.2). Active use of parks or recreational facilities moderated the association between neighborhood social cohesion and depressive symptoms but meeting the recommendations for LTMVPA did not. Latinos who reported active use of parks or recreational facilities and higher levels of neighborhood social cohesion had fewer depressive symptoms than peers who did not use these spaces.

Conclusions:

Future studies are needed to test strategies for promoting active use of parks or recreational facilities to address depression in Latinos.

Perez (lperezconstanza@mail.sdsu.edu) is with the Joint Doctoral Program in Public Health (Global Health), San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego, CA. Arredondo, Elder, and Ayala are with the Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA. McKenzie is with the School of Exercise and Nutritional Science, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA. Holguin is with the Chula Vista Community Collaborative, Chula Vista, CA. Perez, Arredondo, McKenzie, Elder, and Ayala are also with the Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego, CA.