Long-Term Correlates of Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Norwegian Men and Women

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health

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Ane Kristiansen Solbraa
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Ulf Ekelund
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Ingar M. Holme
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Sidsel Graff-Iversen
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Jostein Steene-Johannessen
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Eivind Aadland
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Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
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Background:

Sex, age, body mass index (BMI), perceived health and health behavior are correlates known to affect physical activity and sedentary time. However, studies have often been cross-sectional, and less is known about long-term correlates. Thus, the aims were to investigate 1) the associations between a set of characteristics (demographic, biological, psychological, and behavioral) and objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time at 13-year follow-up, and 2) the association between changes in these characteristics over time and physical activity and sedentary time.

Methods:

Baseline characteristics were collected in 40-year-olds in 1996, and follow-up data on objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time were obtained in 2009 (n = 240). Data were analyzed by multiple linear regressions.

Results:

Self-reported physical activity (P < .001) and improved perceived health (P = .046) were positively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) whereas BMI (P = .034) and increased BMI (P = .014) were negatively associated with MVPA at follow-up. Women spent less time being sedentary than men (P = .019). Education (P < .001) was positively associated and improved perceived health (P = .010) was negatively associated with sedentary time at follow-up.

Conclusions:

MVPA and sedentary time at follow-up were associated with behavioral, biological and demographic correlates. However, the nature of our analyses prevents us from inferring causality.

Solbraa (ane.solbraa@hisf.no), Ekelund, Holme, and Anderssen are with the Dept of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. Solbraa is also with the Faculty of Teacher Education and Sport, Sogn & Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. Graff-Iversen is with the Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Steene-Johannessen is with the Faculty of Teacher Education and Sport, Sogn & Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. Aadland is with the Faculty of Health Studies, Sogn & Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway.

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