Effects of Acute Active Video Games on Endothelial Function Following a High-Fat Meal in Overweight Adolescents

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

We tested the hypothesis that an active video game following a high-fat meal would partially prevent the unfavorable effect of a high-fat meal on vascular function in overweight adolescents.

Methods:

Twenty-four overweight adolescents were randomized to either a 60-minute active video game (AVG) group (n = 12) or seated rest (SR) as a control group (n = 12) after a high-fat meal. Blood parameters were measured, and vascular function was measured using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) at baseline and 3 hours after a high-fat meal.

Results:

No significant interaction was found in any blood parameter. A high-fat meal significantly increased blood triglyceride and glucose concentrations in both groups in a similar manner. Brachial artery FMD significantly decreased in the SR group (13.8 ± 3.2% to 11.8 ± 2.5), but increased in the AVG group (11.4 ± 4.0% to 13.3 ± 3.5), with a significant interaction (P = .034).

Conclusion:

These findings show that an active video game attenuated high-fat meal-induced endothelial dysfunction. This suggests that an active video game may have a cardioprotective effect on endothelial function in overweight adolescents when exposed to a high-fat meal.

Park, Yoon, Lee, and Jae (syjae@uos.ac.kr) are with the Dept of Sport Science, University of Seoul, Seoul, South Korea. Kim is with the Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Bunsawat and Fernhall are with the Dept of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL. Heffernan is with the Dept of Exercise Science, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY.