Reliability of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Movement Skill Competence in 2 Diverse Samples of Young Children

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

The purpose was to determine the reliability of an instrument designed to assess young children’s perceived movement skill competence in 2 diverse samples.

Methods:

A pictorial instrument assessed 12 perceived Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) based on the Test of Gross Motor Development 2nd edition. Intra-Class Correlations (ICC) and internal consistency analyses were conducted. Paired sample t tests assessed change in mean perceived skill scores. Bivariate correlations between the intertrial difference and the mean of the trials explored proportional bias.

Results:

Sample 1 (S1) were culturally diverse Australian children (n = 111; 52% boys) aged 5 to 8 years (mean = 6.4, SD = 1.0) with educated parents. Sample 2 (S2) were racially diverse and socioeconomically disadvantaged American children (n = 110; 57% boys) aged 5 to 10 years (mean = 6.8, SD = 1.1). For all children, the internal consistency for 12 FMS was acceptable (S1 = 0.72, 0.75, S2 = 0.66, 0.67). ICCs were higher in S1 (0.73) than S2 (0.50). Mean changes between trials were small. There was little evidence of proportional bias.

Conclusion:

Lower values in S2 may be due to differences in study demographic and execution. While the instrument demonstrated reliability/internal consistency, further work is recommended in diverse samples.

Barnett (lisa.barnett@deakin.edu.au) is with the Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia. Robinson is with the Dept of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL. Webster is with the School of Kinesiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA. Ridgers is with the Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.

Journal of Physical Activity and Health