Effects of a TAKE 10! Classroom-Based Physical Activity Intervention on Third- to Fifth-Grade Children’s On-task Behavior

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

Prolonged sitting at desks during the school day without a break may result in off-task behavior in students. This study was designed to examine the effects of a classroom physical activity intervention, using TAKE 10!, on elementary school students’ on-task behavior. Nine classes (3rd to 5th grades) from 1 elementary school participated in the program (4-week baseline and 8-week intervention).

Methods:

The students’ on-task behavior was measured using systematic direct observation. Observations occurred once a week during weeks 1 to 4 (baseline) and weeks 8 to 12 (intervention). A two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare on-task behavior between observation periods.

Results:

There was a significant decrease (P = .001) in mean percentage on-task behavior from preno TAKE 10! (91.2 ± 3.4) to postno TAKE 10! (83.5 ± 4.0) during the baseline period, whereas there was a significant increase (P = .001) in mean percentage on-task behavior from pre-TAKE 10! (82.3 ± 4.5) to post-TAKE 10! (89.5 ± 2.7) during the intervention period.

Conclusions:

Furthermore, students who received more daily TAKE 10! were found to be more on-task than students who received less TAKE 10!. The TAKE 10! program is effective in improving students’ on-task behavior in the classroom.

Goh (tanlenggoh@gmail.com) is with the Dept of Physical Education and Health Education, Springfield College, Springfield, MA. Hannon is with the College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. Webster is with the Dept of Physical Education and Athletic Training, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. Podlog and Newton are with the Dept of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

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