Association of Different Physical Activity Domains on All-Cause Mortality in Adults Participating in Primary Care in the Brazilian National Health System: 4-Year Follow-up

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

Evidence has shown that physical activity (PA) is associated with low mortality risk. However, data about reduced mortality due to PA are scarce in developing countries and the dose–response relationship between PA from different domains and all-cause mortality remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the association of PA from different domains on all-cause mortality among Brazilian adults.

Methods:

679 males and females composed the study sample. Participants were divided into quartile groups according to PA from different domains (occupational, sports, and leisure-time). Medical records were used to identify the cause of the death. Cox regression analysis was performed to determine the independent associations of PA from different domains and all-cause mortality.

Results:

During the follow-up period, 59 participants died. The most prevalent cause of death was circulatory system diseases (n = 20; 33.9% [21.8%–45.9%]). Higher scores of occupational (HR= 0.45 [95% CI: 0.20–0.97]), sports (HR= 0.44 [95% CI: 0.20–0.95]) and overall PA (HR= 0.40 [95% CI: 0.17–0.90]) were associated with lower mortality, even after adjustment for confounders.

Conclusions:

The findings in this study showed the importance of being active in different domains to reduce mortality risk.

Turi is with the Biosciences Institute, UNESP, Rio Claro Campus, Rio Claro, SP, Brazil. Codogno and Fernandes are with the Dept of Physical Education, UNESP, Presidente Prudente Campus, Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil; and the Biosciences Institute, UNESP, Rio Claro Campus, Rio Claro, SP, Brazil. Sui and Blair are with the Dept of Exercise Science. University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Lavie is with the Dept of Cardiovascular Diseases, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School, University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA; and the Dept of Preventive Medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA. Monteiro is with the Dept of Physical Education, UNESP, Bauru Campus, Bauru, SP, Brazil; and the Biosciences Institute, UNESP, Rio Claro Campus, Rio Claro, SP, Brazil.

Turi (brunaturi@hotmail.com) is corresponding author.