It Takes a Village Coach: Cost-Effectiveness of an Intervention to Improve Diet and Physical Activity Among Minority Women

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: This study gauged the cost-effectiveness of a community-based health coaching intervention aimed at improving diet and physical activity among women in culturally diverse communities. Methods: The Coalition for a Healthier Community for Utah Women and Girls recruited women from 5 cultural and ethnic groups and randomized them to receive quarterly versus monthly health coaching. Coaching was performed by trained community health workers from the targeted communities. Cost-effectiveness ratios were estimated to gauge the cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Results: Estimated quality-adjusted life years gained from both increased physical activity and improved diet were positive. Cost-effectiveness ratios varied by intervention arm, but all ratios fell within the favorable range described in the literature. Conclusions: This culturally adapted health coaching intervention was deemed to be cost-effective. Our findings suggest that to achieve the highest level of cost-effectiveness, programs should focus on enrolling at-risk women who do not meet recommended physical activity standards and/or dietary guidelines.

Buder is with Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID. Zick, Waitzman, Simonsen, Sunada, and Digre are with The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

Buder (budeiris@isu.edu) is corresponding author.
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