Moderating Effects of Depression, Food Cravings, and Weight-Related Quality-of-Life on Associations of Treatment-Targeted Psychosocial Changes and Physical Activity in Adolescent Candidates for Bariatric Surgery

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: Physical activity is a strong predictor of sustaining weight loss. Yet physical activity has been challenging to maintain. Adolescent bariatric surgery is increasing, and there is typically an initial 6-month period when improving health behaviors such as physical activity are addressed by a clinic-based team. However, there is minimal understanding of how to target psychosocial factors relevant for behavioral changes. Methods: A group of 15 adolescent candidates for bariatric surgery (mean age = 15.1 y; mean body mass index = 55.9 kg/m2) were assessed on changes in 3 theory-based predictors of physical activity from baseline–month 3 and baseline–month 6. Results: Changes in physical activity-related self-regulation and self-efficacy over 3 months significantly predicted change in physical activity over 6 months. Reciprocal relationships were also significant, including the prediction of physical activity change by change in negative mood. The clinical psychology-based factor of weight-related quality-of-life significantly moderated the prediction of self-regulation via physical activity, and degree of depressive symptoms significantly moderated the prediction of changes in physical activity through self-efficacy changes. Conclusions: Because improvements in several theory-based psychosocial variables related to physical activity have demonstrated a carry-over to controlling eating, the improved understanding of those variables for treating adolescents with severe obesity was useful.

Annesi is with YMCA of Metro Atlanta, Atlanta, GA and also with Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA.

Annesi (jamesa@ymcaatlanta.org) is corresponding author.
Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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