Independent Associations and Interactions of Perceived Neighborhood and Psychosocial Constructs on Adults’ Physical Activity

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year online subscription

USD  $117.00

1 year online subscription

USD  $156.00

Student 2 year online subscription

USD  $222.00

2 year online subscription

USD  $296.00

Background: Neighborhood and psychosocial variables are related to physical activity (PA), yet interactions between these factors in predicting PA are infrequently studied. Methods: This analysis examines the independent associations and interactions between self-reported neighborhood and psychosocial variables in relation to moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) among adults from a US panel sample. Results: In adjusted models, neighborhood social capital was positively associated with meeting MVPA guidelines. Fewer barriers, greater self-efficacy, and greater autonomous motivation also corresponded with greater odds of meeting MVPA guidelines. An interaction between social capital and autonomous motivation showed that social capital was only associated with MVPA when autonomous motivation was high. Participants who reported both high autonomous motivation and high social capital were most likely to meet MVPA guidelines. Conclusions: Neighborhood social capital, barriers, self-efficacy, and autonomous motivation may be important correlates in promoting adults’ PA. Future directions include using objective neighborhood and PA data in similar analyses and investigating associations of neighborhood and psychosocial variables with multiple PA activities. Intervention research to promote PA should also examine whether effects of interventions targeting psychosocial constructs are moderated by features of an individual’s neighborhood or whether perceived social capital can be addressed in interventions in conjunction with psychosocial variables.

Dwyer is with Cape Fox Facilities Services, Manassas, VA. Dwyer and Nebeling are with Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD. Patel is with Health Behaviors Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD. Oh is with Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD.

Dwyer (laura.dwyer@nih.gov) is corresponding author.
  • 1.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Exercise or physical activity. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/exercise.htm. Updated July 20, 2015. Accessed September 1, 2015.

    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical activity and health. http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/pa-health/. Updated June 4, 2015. Accessed September 1, 2015.

    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Bandura A. Social cognitive theory: an agentic perspective. Annu Rev Psychol. 2001;52:126. PubMed doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.52.1.1

  • 4.

    McAlister AL, Perry CL, Parcel GS. How individuals, environments, and health behaviors interact: social cognitive theory. In: Glanz K, Rimer BK, Viswanath K, eds. Health Behavior and Health Education. 4th ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 2008:169188.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Sallis JF, Owen N, Fisher EB. Ecological models of health behavior. In: Glanz K, Rimer BK, Viswanath K, eds. Health Behavior and Health Education. 4th ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 2008:465485.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Sallis JF, Cervero RB, Ascher W, Henderson KA, Kraft MK, Kerr J. An ecological approach to creating active living communities. Annu Rev Public Health. 2006;27:297322. PubMed doi:10.1146/annurev.publhealth.27.021405.102100

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Ferdinand AO, Sen B, Rahurkar S, Engler S, Menachemi N. The relationship between built environments and physical activity: a systematic review. Am J Public Health. 2012;102(10):713. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.300740

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Van Holle V, Deforche B, Van Cauwenberg J, et al. Relationship between the physical environment and different domains of physical activity in European adults: a systematic review. BMC Public Health. 2012;12:807. PubMed doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-807

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Wendel-Vos W, Droomers M, Kremers S, Brug J, van Lenthe F. Potential environmental determinants of physical activity in adults: a systematic review. Obes Rev. 2007;8(5):425440. PubMed doi:10.1111/j.1467-789X.2007.00370.x

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Renalds A, Smith TH, Hale PJ. A systematic review of built environment and health. Fam Community Health. 2010;33(1):6878. PubMed doi:10.1097/FCH.0b013e3181c4e2e5

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Kawachi I, Subramanian SV, Almeida-Filho N. A glossary for health inequalities. J Edpidemiol Community Health. 2002;56(9):647652. doi:10.1136/jech.56.9.647

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    McNeill LH, Kreuter MW, Subramanian SV. Social environment and physical activity: a review of concepts and evidence. Soc Sci Med. 2006;63(4):10111022. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.03.012

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Nieminen T, Prättälä R, Martelin T, et al. Social capital, health behaviours and health: a population-based associational study. BMC Public Health. 2013;13:613. PubMed doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-613

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Legh-Jones H, Moore S. Network social capital, social participation, and physical inactivity in an urban adult population. Soc Sci Med. 2012;74(9):13621367. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.005

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Lindström M. Social capital, desire to increase physical activity and leisure-time physical activity: a population-based study. Public Health. 2011;125(7):442447. doi:10.1016/j.puhe.2011.01.015

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ. Social cognitive theory and physical activity: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obes Rev. 2014;15(12):983995. PubMed doi:10.1111/obr.12225

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Teixeira PJ, Carraça EV, Markland D, Silva MN, Ryan RM. Exercise, physical activity, and self-determination theory: a systematic review. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012;9:78. PubMed doi:10.1186/1479-5868-9-78

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Mailey EL, Huberty J, Dinkel D, McAuley E. Physical activity barriers and facilitators among working mothers and fathers. BMC Public Health. 2014;14:657. PubMed doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-657

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Cerin E, Leslie E, Sugiyama T, Owen N. Perceived barriers to leisure-time physical activity in adults: an ecological perspective. J Phys Act Health. 2010;7(4):451459. PubMed doi:10.1123/jpah.7.4.451

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Vo PT, Bogg T. Testing Theory of Planned Behavior and Neo-Socioanalytic Theory models of trait activity, industriousness, exercise social cognitions, exercise intentions, and physical activity in a representative U.S. sample. Front Psychol. 2015;6:1114. PubMed doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01114

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Wasserkampf A, Silva MN, Santos IC, et al. Short- and long-term theory-based predictors of physical activity in women who participated in a weight-management program. Health Educ Res. 2014;29(6):941952. PubMed doi:10.1093/her/cyu060

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Carlson JA, Sallis JF, Conway TL, et al. Interactions between psychosocial and built environment factors in explaining older adults’ physical activity. Prev Med. 2012;54(1):6873. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.10.004

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    Ding D, Sallis JF, Conway TL, et al. Interactive effects of built environment and psychosocial attributes on physical activity: a test of ecological models. Ann Behav Med. 2012;44(3):365374. PubMed doi:10.1007/s12160-012-9394-1

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24.

    Van Holle V, Van Cauwenberg J, Deforche B, et al. Do psychosocial factors moderate the association between objective neighborhood walkability and older adults’ physical activity? Health Place. 2015;34:118125. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.healthplace.2015.05.004

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Cerin E, Vandelanotte C, Leslie E, Merom D. Recreational facilities and leisure-time physical activity: an analysis of moderators and self-efficacy as a mediator. Health Psychol. 2008;27(suppl 2):S126S135. doi:10.1037/0278-6133.27.2(Suppl.).S126

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    Van Dyck D, Cerin E, Conway TL, et al. Interacting psychosocial and environmental correlates of leisure-time physical activity: a three-country study. Health Psychol. 2014;33(7):699709. PubMed doi:10.1037/a0033516

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 27.

    Van Dyck D, Cardon G, Deforche B, De Bourdeaudhuij I. Urban-rural differences in physical activity in Belgian adults and the importance of psychosocial factors. J Urban Health. 2011;88(1):154167. doi:10.1007/s11524-010-9536-3

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28.

    Oh AY, Davis T., Dwyer LA, et al. Recruitment, enrollment, and response of parent-adolescent dyads in the FLASHE study. Am J Prev Med. 2017;52(6):849855. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2016.11.028

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29.

    Craig CL, Marshall AL, Sjöstrom M, et al. International physical activity questionnaire: 12-country reliability and validity. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35(8):13811395. PubMed doi:10.1249/01.MSS.0000078924.61453.FB

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 30.

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. 2008. https://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/. Accessed December 13, 2016.

    • Export Citation
  • 31.

    Resnicow K, Taylor R, Baskin M, McCarty F. Results of go girls: a weight control program for overweight African-American adolescent females. Obes Res. 2005;13(10):17391748. PubMed doi:10.1038/oby.2005.212

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32.

    Motl RW, Dishman RK, Trost SG, et al. Factorial validity and invariance of questionnaires measuring social-cognitive determinants of physical activity among adolescent girls. Prev Med. 2000;31(5):584594. PubMed doi:10.1006/pmed.2000.0735

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 33.

    Levesque CS, Williams GC, Elliot D, Pickering M, Bodenhamer B, Finley PJ. Validating the theoretical structure of the Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire (TSRQ) across three different health behaviors. Health Educ Res. 2007;22(5):691702. PubMed doi:10.1093/her/cyl148

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 34.

    Self Determination Theory. Perceived Competence Scales. http://selfdeterminationtheory.org/perceived-competence-scales/. Accessed September 1, 2017.

    • Export Citation
  • 35.

    Blumberg SJ, Olson L, Frankel MR, Osborn L, Srinath KP, Giambo P. Design and operation of the National Survey of Children’s Health, 2003. Vital Health Stat. 2005;1(43):1131.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 36.

    Rosenberg D, Ding D, Sallis JF, et al. Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale for Youth (NEWS-Y): reliability and relationship with physical activity. Prev Med. 2009;49(2–3):213218. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2009.07.011

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 37.

    Lindström M, Hanson BS, Ostergren PO. Socioeconomic differences in leisure-time physical activity: the role of social participation and social capital in shaping health related behaviour. Soc Sci Med. 2001;52(3):441451. doi:10.1016/S0277-9536(00)00153-2

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 38.

    Kim D, Kawachi I. A multilevel analysis of key forms of community- and individual-level social capital as predictors of self-rated health in the United States. J Urban Health. 2006;83(5):813826. PubMed doi:10.1007/s11524-006-9082-1

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 39.

    Gilbert KL, Quinn SC, Goodman RM, Butler J, Wallace J. A meta-analysis of social capital and health: a case for needed research. J Health Psychol. 2013;18(11):13851399. PubMed doi:10.1177/1359105311435983

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 40.

    Ball K, Cleland VJ, Timperio AF, Salmon J, Giles-Corti B, Crawford DA. Love thy neighbour? Associations of social capital and crime with physical activity amongst women. Soc Sci Med. 2010;71(4):807814. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.04.041

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 41.

    Rovniak LS, Anderson ES, Winett RA, Stephens RS. Social cognitive determinants of physical activity in young adults: a prospective structural equation analysis. Ann Behav Med. 2002;24(2):149156. PubMed doi:10.1207/S15324796ABM2402_12

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 42.

    Juniper KC, Oman RF, Hamm RM, Kerby DS. The relationships among constructs in the health belief model and the transtheoretical model among African-American college women for physical activity. Am J Health Promot. 2004;18(5):354357. PubMed doi:10.4278/0890-1171-18.5.354

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 43.

    Teixeira PJ, Carraca EV, Marques MM, et al. Successful behavior change in obesity interventions in adults: a systematic review of self-regulation mediators. BMC Med. 2015;13:84. PubMed doi:10.1186/s12916-015-0323-6

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 44.

    Beenackers MA, Kamphuis CB, Prins RG, Mackenbach JP, Burdorf A, van Lenthe FJ. Urban form and psychosocial factors: do they interact for leisure-time walking? Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014;46(2):293301. PubMed doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000017

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 45.

    Beenackers MA, Kamphuis CB, Mackenbach JP, Burdorf A, van Lenthe FJ. Why some walk and others don’t: exploring interactions of perceived safety and social neighborhood factors with psychosocial cognitions. Health Educ Res. 2013;28(2):220233. PubMed doi:10.1093/her/cyt002

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 46.

    Friederichs SA, Kremers SP, Lechner L, de Vries NK. Neighborhood walkability and walking behavior: the moderating role of action orientation. J Phys Act Health. 2013;10(4):515522. PubMed doi:10.1123/jpah.10.4.515

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 47.

    Van Dyck D, Deforche B, Cardon G, De Bourdeaudhuij I. Neighbourhood walkability and its particular importance for adults with a preference for passive transport. Health Place. 2009;15(2):496504. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.healthplace.2008.08.010

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 48.

    McGinn AP, Evenson KR, Herring AH, Huston SL, Rodriguez DA. Exploring associations between physical activity and perceived and objective measures of the built environment. J Urban Health. 2007;84(2):162184. PubMed doi:10.1007/s11524-006-9136-4

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 49.

    Ball K, Jeffery RW, Crawford DA, Roberts RJ, Salmon J, Timperio AF. Mismatch between perceived and objective measures of physical activity environments. Prev Med. 2008;47(3):294298. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.05.001

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 50.

    Lee PH, Macfarlane DJ, Lam TH, Stewart SM. Validity of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Form (IPAQ-SF): a systematic review. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:115. PubMed doi:10.1186/1479-5868-8-115

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 51.

    Boone-Heinonen J, Gordon-Larsen P, Guilkey DK, Jacobs DR Jr, Popkin BM. Environment and physical activity dynamics: the role of residential self-selection. Psychol Sport Exerc. 2011;12(1):5460. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2009.09.003

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 52.

    McCormack GR, Shiell A. In search of causality: a systematic review of the relationship between the built environment and physical activity among adults. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:125. PubMed doi:10.1186/1479-5868-8-125

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 53.

    Arvidsson D, Kawakami N, Ohlsson H, Sundquist K. Physical activity and concordance between objective and perceived walkability. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012;44(2):280287. PubMed doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e31822a9289

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 54.

    Gebel K, Bauman A, Owen N. Correlates of non-concordance between perceived and objective measures of walkability. Ann Behav Med. 2009;37(2):228238. PubMed doi:10.1007/s12160-009-9098-3

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 131 83 13
Full Text Views 5 5 0
PDF Downloads 5 5 0