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Purpose: To analyze the relationship between engagement in sports in early life and bone variables among adults of both sexes. Methods: The sample was composed of 225 men and women. Demographic data were collected, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess bone mineral density, bone mineral content, and lean soft tissue. Sports participation in early life was assessed by an interview including childhood and adolescence. Consumption of tobacco and alcohol was also assessed by interview and the habitual physical activity level by a pedometer. Results: Inactive men had bone mineral content around 11% lower than active men in childhood or adolescence, whereas for women, this difference represented around 14%. Active men had 74% less fat mass than inactive men in early life, and the difference was 67% for women. Early sports participation explained the differences in whole-body bone mineral content (16.8%, P-value = .005) and bone mineral density (8.8%, P-value = .015), as well as bone mineral density in lower limbs (18.9%, P-value = .001) among women. Conclusion: Adults engaged in sports in early life have higher bone mass than their inactive peers, especially women.

Mantovani, Gobbo, Codogno, and Fernandes are with the Post-graduation Program in Kinesiology, Institute of Bioscience, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil. Mantovani, de Lima, Turi-Lynch, Codogno, and Fernandes are with the Laboratory of Investigation in Exercise (LIVE), Dept of Physical Education, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil. Ronque and Romanzini are with the Londrina State University (UEL), Londrina, Paraná, Brazil.

Mantovani (leka_indy@hotmail.com) is corresponding author.
Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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