Evaluation of Event Physical Activity Engagement at an Open Streets Initiative Within a Texas–Mexico Border Town

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $115.00

1 year subscription

USD $153.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $218.00

2 year subscription

USD $285.00

Background: Open streets initiatives provide an opportunity to engage in physical activity (PA) freely by temporarily closing streets to motorized traffic. Methods: Route counting estimation and event intercept surveys (n = 682) were conducted across 4 CycloBia events in Brownsville, TX, in 2015 to determine sociodemographics, PA engagement at the event, event awareness, and past CycloBia attendance. Results: Cycling was the most commonly observed activity along the route (73.6%) followed by walking (22.9%). Attendees self-reported a median of 120 minutes in PA with 17.3% of attendees meeting recommended weekly PA guidelines at the event. Significant predictors of meeting PA guidelines via event PA engagement were past event attendance, sex, age, and Hispanic ethnicity. Conclusions: Findings suggest that CycloBia reached a large, low-income, predominantly Hispanic population and may be effective in promoting PA. Results help understand the effect of an open streets initiative on attendees living in a midsize, border city.

Salazar-Collier and Reininger are with the UTHealth School of Public Health in Brownsville, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Brownsville, TX. Gowen is with the City of Brownsville, Brownsville, TX. Rodriguez is with the Public Health Department, City of Brownsville, Brownsville, TX. Wilkinson is with the UTHealth School of Public Health in Austin, University of Texas School of Public Health, Health Science Center at Houston, Austin, TX.

Salazar-Collier (cindy.l.salazar@uth.tmc.edu) is corresponding author.
Journal of Physical Activity and Health
Article Sections
References
  • 1.

    Torres ADSarmiento OLPratt Met al. Recreational Ciclovías: an urban planning & public health program of the Americas with a Latin flavor. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41(5):47. doi:10.1249/01.mss.0000353411.00986.fd

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Leap M. A literature review of current events and trends in Ciclovía programs across America. Presented at: the 12th National Conference on Transportation Planning for Small and Medium-Sized Communities; September 2010; Williamsburg, VA. https://trid.trb.org/view/1253571. Accessed October 14 2017.

    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Sarmiento OLTorres AJacoby EPratt MSchmid TLStierling G. The Ciclovía-Recreativa: a mass-recreational program with public health potential. J Phys Act Health. 2010;7(suppl 2):163. doi:10.1123/jpah.7.s2.s163

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Open Streets Project. Open streets initiatives. Open Streets Project; 2011. http://openstreetsproject.org/map-of-open-streets-initiatives/.Accessed October 12 2017.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Montes FSarmiento OLZarama Ret al. Do health benefits outweigh the costs of mass recreational programs? An economic analysis of four Ciclovía programs. J Urban Health. 2012;89(1):153170. PubMed doi:10.1007/s11524-011-9628-8

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Torres ASarmiento OLStauber CZarama R. The Ciclovia and Cicloruta programs: promising interventions to promote physical activity and social capital in Bogotá, Colombia. Am J Public Health. 2013;103(2):e2330. PubMed doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.301142

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Zieff SGKim MSWilson JTierney P. A“ Ciclovia” in San Francisco: characteristics and physical activity behavior of Sunday Streets participants. J Phys Act Health. 2014;11(2):249255. PubMed doi:10.1123/jpah.2011-0290

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Engelberg JKCarlson JABlack MLRyan SSallis JF. Ciclovía participation and impacts in San Diego, CA: the first CicloSDias. Prev Med. 2014;69:S66S73. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.10.005

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    United States Census Bureau. Quick facts: Brownsville, Texas. United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/brownsvillecitytexas/PST045216. Accessed October 14 2017.

    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Fisher-Hoch SPVatcheva KPLaing STet al. Missed opportunities for diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia in a Mexican American population, Cameron County Hispanic Cohort, 2003–2008. Prev Chronic Dis. 2012;9:110298. PubMed

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Fisher-Hoch SPRentfro ARSalinas JJet al. Socioeconomic status and prevalence of obesity and diabetes in a Mexican American community, Cameron County, Texas, 2004–2007. Prev Chronic Dis. 2010;7:A53. PubMed

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Physical activity guidelines for Americans. 2016. http://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/. Accessed April 1 2016.

    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    McKenzie TLCohen DASehgal AWilliamson SGolinelli D. System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC): reliability and feasibility measures. J Phys Act Health. 2006;3:S208. PubMed doi:10.1123/jpah.3.s1.s208

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Sarmiento OLdel Castillo ADJacoby Eet al. Car Free Sundays (Ciclovía Recreativa) Implementation and Advocacy Manual. Ciclovia Recreativa. 2009. http://cicloviarecreativa.uniandes.edu.co/english/images/anexos/CICLOVIASmanual_english.pdf. Accessed February 24 2016.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Sallis JF. Measures: CiclosDias. 2014. http://sallis.ucsd.edu/measure_ciclosdias.html. Accessed November 30 2017.

    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Godin GShephard RJ. Godin leisure-time exercise questionnaire. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1997;29(suppl 6):S36S38.

  • 17.

    Hipp JAEyler A. Open streets initiatives: measuring success toolkits. Active Living Research. 2014. http://activelivingresearch.org/open-streets-initiatives-measuring-success-toolkit. Accessed February 24 2016.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Cohen DHan BDerose KWilliamson SPaley ABatteate C. CicLAvia: evaluation of participation, physical activity and cost of an open streets event in Los Angeles. Prev Med. 2016;90:2633. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.06.009

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Torres ASteward JStrasser SLyn RSerna RStauber C. Atlanta Streets Alive: a movement building a culture of health in an urban environment. J Phys Act Health. 2016;13(2):239246. PubMed doi:10.1123/jpah.2015-0064

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Sarmiento OLRios APPaez DCQuijano KFermino RC. The Recreovía of Bogotá, a community-based physical activity program to promote physical activity among women: baseline results of the natural experiment Al Ritmo de las Comunidades. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017;14(6):pii: E633. PubMed doi:10.3390/ijerph14060633

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Milanović ZPantelić STrajković NSporiš GKostić RJames N. Age-related decrease in physical activity and functional fitness among elderly men and women. Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:549556. doi:10.2147/CIA.S44112

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Caspersen CJPereira MACurran KM. Changes in physical activity patterns in the United States, by sex and cross-sectional age. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000;32:16011609. PubMed doi:10.1097/00005768-200009000-00013

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    Troiano RPBerrigan DDodd KWMâsse LCTilert TMcDowell M. Physical activity in the United States measured by accelerometer. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008;40:181188. PubMed doi:10.1249/mss.0b013e31815a51b3

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24.

    Tucker JMWelk GJBeyler NK. Physical activity in US adults: compliance with the physical activity guidelines for Americans. Am J Prev Med. 2011;40:454461. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2010.12.016

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Murphy NMBauman A. Mass sporting and physical activity events—are they “bread and circuses” or public health interventions to increase population levels of physical activity? J Phys Act Health. 2007;4:193202. PubMed doi:10.1123/jpah.4.2.193

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Percent of adults who engage in no leisure-time physical activity. 2017. https://chronicdata.cdc.gov/Nutrition-Physical-Activity-and-Obesity/Percent-of-Adults-who-engage-in-no-leisure-time-ph/8mz7-s5ke. Accessed September 9 2017.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 27.

    Cortes DE. Variations in Familism in two generations of Puerto Ricans. Hispanic J Behav Sci. 1995;17:249255. doi:10.1177/07399863950172008

  • 28.

    McKeown REGarrison CZJackson KLCuffe SPAddy CLWaller JL. Family structure and cohesion, and depressive symptoms in adolescents. J Res Adolesc. 1997;7:267281. doi:10.1207/s15327795jra0703_2

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29.

    Bigman GRajesh VKoehly LMStrong LLOluyomi AWilkinson AV. Family cohesion and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among Mexican origin adolescents: a longitudinal perspective. J Phys Act Health. 2015;12:10231030. doi:10.1123/jpah.2014-0014

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 30.

    Reininger BWang JCron SFisher-Hoch SP. Preventive health behaviors among Hispanics: comparing a US-Mexico border cohort and national sample. Int J Exerc Sci. 2012;6:19.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
Article Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 30 30 8
Full Text Views 0 0 0
PDF Downloads 0 0 0
Altmetric Badge
PubMed
Google Scholar