The Relationship Between Physical Activity Level of Parents and That of Their Adolescent Children

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: Intergenerational transmission, which refers to the similarity between parent and their children, is a possible explanation of adolescent physical activity (PA). However, only a few existing studies explore the relationship of parent–adolescent PA in East Asian countries. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the association of parent–adolescent PA using a nationally representative data in Korea with a large sample size. Methods: Data were collected from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted from 2010 to 2014. The authors performed a linear mixed effects regression analysis with 1342 cases after using log conversion of parent and adolescent moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) levels. Results: In the study, the median MVPA of adolescents was 150 (interquartile range: 360) minutes per week. Adolescent MVPA levels were significantly correlated with their mother’s MVPA (β = 0.055, P = .02). Similar findings of greater association in girls and younger adolescents (age: 13–15 y) were found in subgroup analysis (girls: β = 0.073, P = .05; younger adolescents: β = 0.103, P = .001). Conclusion: Increasing maternal PA levels could stimulate their adolescent’s PA levels. Therefore, intervention at the family level may lead to an increase in adolescent PA levels.

Yoon, Lee, Ju, and Nam are with the Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Yoon, Lee, Ju, Nam, and Park are with the Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Park is also with the Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Park (ecpark@yuhs.ac) is corresponding author.
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