Longitudinal Associations Between Sedentary Behavior and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescent Girls Followed 6 Years

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: To examine longitudinal associations between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms among adolescent girls. Methods: A 6-year longitudinal study was conducted consisting of 3 waves, each separated by 3 years. Participants’ (n = 249, mean age 12.1 y at baseline) sedentary behaviors were registered using ecological momentary assessment and girls completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Structural equation modeling of cross-lagged panel models was used to test longitudinal and bidirectional associations. Results: The findings showed that the autoregressive effects were stable for sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms. The cross-lagged effects indicated that the depressive symptoms positively predicted sedentary behavior from early to late adolescence. However, sedentary behavior did not predict depressive symptoms across adolescence. Conclusions: This study shows 1-directional long-term effect of depressive symptoms on sedentary behavior in adolescent girls. Future research on longitudinal relationships between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms among children and adolescents are needed.

The authors are with the Institute of Sport Sciences and Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.

Raudsepp (lennart.raudsepp@ut.ee) is corresponding author.
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