Evaluating the Acceptability of Low-Cost Standing Desks in the Home Environment: An Exploratory Study

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: Many studies have attempted to mitigate the negative health consequences of sedentary behavior (SB) in the work environment using standing desks. However, no studies have explored the use of standing desks in the home. Purpose: To evaluate interest, factors influencing desk usage, and acceptability of a low-cost standing desk in the home. Methods: Participants (adults aged 18-65 years living in university residential areas) received a low-cost standing desk, and completed online surveys at baseline and 4 weeks to assess leisure SB. After 4 weeks, participants completed a phone interview to assess level of engagement and acceptability. A follow-up interview was conducted at 6 months. A descriptive content analysis was conducted. Results: A total of 71 participants were recruited, with 55 and 49 participants completing the 4-week and 6-month interview, respectively. At 4 weeks, there was a self-reported decline in weekday leisure SB (P < .05), but not on weekend days. Approximately 75% of interviewed participants reported using the desk every week. After 6 months, 21 participants (30%) were still using the desk. Conclusion: This study indicates interest in using standing desks in the home. Future research could examine the behavioral and health impact of SB interventions in this setting.

The authors are with the School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Faulkner (guy.faulkner@ubc.ca) is corresponding author.
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