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Background: The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regressions evaluating the effects of isolated strength training (ST), compared with a control group, on total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), C-reactive protein (CRP), and adiponectin of adults. Methods: Embase, PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus data sources were searched up to May 2017. Clinical trials that compared ST with a control group of adults older than 18 years, which evaluated blood TC, TG, LDL, HDL, CRP, or adiponectin as an outcome were included. Random effect was used and the effect size (ES) was calculated by using the standardized mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. Results: ST promotes a reduction in TC (ES: −0.399; P < .001), TG (ES: −0.204; P = .002), LDL (ES: −0.451; P < .001), and CRP (ES: −0.542; P = .01) levels. In addition, ST is associated to an increase in HDL (ES: 0.363; P < .001) and adiponectin concentrations (ES: 1.105; P = .01). Conclusion: ST promotes decreases in TC, TG, LDL, and CRP levels and increases HDL and adiponectin concentrations. Thus, progressive ST could be a potential therapeutic option for improving abnormalities in lipid and inflammatory outcomes in adults.

Costa is with the School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Dance, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Buttelli, Vieira, Coconcelli, Magalhães, and Kruel are with the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Delevatti is with the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.

Costa (rochelle.costa@ufrgs.br) is corresponding author.

Supplementary Materials

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