Exploring Stakeholders’ Perceptions of the Acceptability, Usability, and Dissemination of the Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years were recently developed. To maximize the uptake of the guidelines, perceptions of key stakeholders were sought. Methods: Thirty-five stakeholders (11% Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent) participated in focus groups or key informant interviews. Stakeholders included parents of children aged 0–5 years, early childhood educators, and health and policy professionals, recruited using convenience and snowballing techniques. Focus groups and interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed inductively using thematic analysis. Results: There was general acceptance of the Movement Guidelines. The stakeholders suggested that the Guidelines were highly aspirational and needed to be carefully messaged, so parents did not feel guilty if their child was not meeting them. Stakeholders identified that the messaging needed to be culturally appropriate and visually appealing. Dissemination strategies differed depending on the stakeholder. Conclusion: Seeking stakeholder perceptions is an important process in the development of national Movement Guidelines. This study successfully examined stakeholders’ perceptions regarding the acceptability, usability, and dissemination of the Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. Effective and innovative strategies for maximizing compliance and uptake of the Guidelines should be prioritized.

Stanley, Jones, and Okely are with Early Start, Faculty of Social Sciences and Illawarra Health & Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia. Swann is with the School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia. Christian is with the School of Population and Global Health, and Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. Sherring is with Early Start, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia. Shilton is with Heart Foundation, Subiaco, WA, Australia.

Jones (rachelj@uow.edu.au) is corresponding author.
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