High-Intensity Interval Versus Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in Individuals With Parkinson’s Disease: Hemodynamic and Functional Adaptation

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Purpose: To investigate the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) versus moderate-intensity continuous exercise training (MICE) on hemodynamic and functional variables in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Methods: Twenty participants (13 men) were randomly assigned to a thrice-weekly HIIT (n = 12) or MICE (n = 8) for 12 weeks. Hemodynamic (resting heart rate and blood pressure, carotid femoral pulse wave velocity, endothelial reactivity, and heart rate variability) and functional variables (5-time sit-to-stand, timed up and go, and 6-min walking tests) assessed before and after training. Results: Demographic, hemodynamic and functional variables were similar between groups at baseline. Endothelial reactivity tended to increase after HIIT, but not after MICE, resulting in improved level (∼8%, P < .01) of this variable in HIIT versus MICE during follow-up. Six-minute walking test improved after HIIT (10.4 ± 3.8%, P < .05), but did not change after MICE. Sit to stand improved similarly after HIIT (27.2 ± 6.1%, P < .05) and MICE (21.5 ± 5.4%, P < .05). No significant changes were found after HIIT or MICE in any other variable assessed. Conclusion: These results suggest that exercise intensity may influence training-induced adaptation on endothelial reactivity and aerobic capacity in individuals with Parkinson’s disease.

Fernandes, Arthuso, Ngomane, and Ciolac are with the Exercise and Chronic Disease Research Laboratory (ECDR), Department of Physical Education, School of Sciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Bauru, Brazil. Barbieri, Silva, Moretto, and Imaizumi are with the Human Movement Research Laboratory (MOVI-LAB), Department of Physical Education, School of Sciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Bauru, Brazil. Guimarães is with the Heart Institute, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Arthuso is also with the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Ciolac (emmanuel.ciolac@unesp.br) is corresponding author.
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