Physical Activity Guidelines Compliance and Its Relationship With Preventative Health Behaviors and Risky Health Behaviors

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: People who are physically active enjoy a multitude of health benefits across their lifespan compared with people who are not physically active. However, little research has sought to determine whether those who meet the physical activity (PA) guidelines also engage in other healthy behaviors. The purpose of this study was to compare healthy behaviors of people who met the PA guidelines set forth by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to those who did not meet the guidelines. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey conducted in 2017. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed using chi-square tests. Odds and adjusted odds ratios were calculated using multiple logistic regressions. Results: Those who met the PA guidelines were more likely to get a flu shot, have a medical checkup, take human immunodeficiency virus tests, wear seatbelts, and binge drink more frequently, compared with those who did not meet the guidelines. This group is also less likely to be smokers and be overweight or obese in comparison to their inactive counterparts. Conclusion: The positive association between PA and other healthy behaviors represents synergistic health activities, with healthy behaviors supporting others.

Pharr and Bungum are with the School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA. Terencio is with the School of Integrated Health Science, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA.

Pharr (Jennifer.pharr@unlv.edu) is corresponding author.
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