Effect of Evidence-Based Materials and Access to Local Resources on Physical Activity Levels, Beliefs, and Motivation During Pregnancy in a Rural Setting

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of evidence-based educational materials and access to local resources on physical activity (PA) levels, beliefs, and motivation (including self-efficacy) regarding PA during pregnancy in a rural setting. Methods: Information on PA levels (step counts, Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire) and beliefs and motivation regarding PA (main surveys: Exercise Beliefs Questionnaire, Protection Motivation Theory and Health Action Process Approach) were collected between 8 and 16 weeks gestation. Women from a rural community were randomly assigned to the PA group (PAG, n = 38) or control group (n = 32). The PAG participants received an evidence-based educational brochure and access (at no charge to them) to local fitness facilities. At approximately 34 to 37 weeks gestation, baseline assessments were repeated. Results: Sedentary time was significantly different between groups over time, with control participants increasing sedentary time and PAG participants decreasing sedentary time (P = .04). Sixteen women (42%) in the PAG utilized the resources provided (prenatal yoga being utilized most). Postintervention, there was a significant group × time interaction for Perceived Self-Efficacy scores; scores in the PAG remained consistent with baseline values, whereas scores in the control group decreased (P = .03). Conclusions: The intervention reduced sedentary time and maintained self-efficacy scores during pregnancy.

Tinius, Edens, and Lyons are with the Exercise Science Program, School of Kinesiology, Recreation & Sport, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA. Link and Jones are with the School of Nursing and Allied Health, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA. Rebelle is with the Dept. of Performance Psychology, Grand Canyon University, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Pearson is with the Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USA. Maples is with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, Knoxville, TN, USA.

Tinius (Rachel.tinius@wku.edu) is corresponding author.

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