Test–Retest Reliability of activPAL in Measuring Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity in People With Type 2 Diabetes

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: To investigate how changes in sedentary behavior relate to health outcomes, it is important to establish the test–retest reliability of activity monitors in measuring habitual sedentary behavior in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) as a prerequisite for interpreting this information. Thus, the authors’ objective was to examine the test–retest reliability of a common activity monitor (activPAL) in measuring sedentary behavior and physical activity in people with T2D. Methods: Sedentary-time, standing-time, stepping-time, step-count, and sit-to-stand transitions were obtained from two 7-day assessment periods separated by at least 1 week. Test–retest reliability was determined with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) to compare sedentary and activity measures between the 2 time points. Results: A total of 30 participants with self-reported T2D completed the study (age 65 [6] y, 63% women, body mass index 33.3 [5] kg/m2). High test–retest reliability was found for sedentary-time (ICC = .79; 95% confidence interval [CI], .61–.89) and standing-time (ICC = .74; 95% CI, .53–.87). Very high test–retest reliability was found for stepping-time (ICC = .90; 95% CI, .81–.95), step-count (ICC = .91; 95% CI, .83–.96), and sit-to-stand transitions (ICC = .90; 95% CI, .79–.95). Conclusion: The activPAL device showed high to very high test–retest reliability in measuring all tested activity categories in people with T2D.

Alothman is with the Lifestyle and Health Research Center, Health Science Research Center, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Alothman, Rucker, and Kluding are with the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. Hoover is with the Department of Educational Psychology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. Alshehri is with the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia. Alenazi is with the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physical Therapy, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj, Saudi Arabia. Wick is with the Department of Biostatistics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. LeMaster is with the Department of Family Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Alothman (shaima.alothman.pt@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
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