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Background: Sedentariness has been shown to increase energy intake and is associated with increased obesity prevalence. Active workstations are used to implement physical activity interventions in workplaces, but it is unclear if they can lead to reductions in body weight. This study aims to observe the acute impact of a standing desk on energy intake and appetite sensations. Methods: Participants came to the laboratory, where they were randomly assigned to a seated or a standing desk. They completed a work session (∼75 min) during which they performed cognitive tasks and reported their levels of stress. Following this, they had a 15-minute break during which buffet-type snacks were served. Subjects were asked to rate their appetite sensations on visual analog scales. Results: Thirty-six normal-weight men and women aged 24.3 (4.3) years participated in this study. Energy intake from snacks was similar (P = .472) between participants who sat (427.8 [286.9] kcal) and the ones who stood (461.2 [272.8] kcal) during the work session. There was no difference in satiety quotients around the snack and no significant interaction time × condition for appetite sensations. Conclusion: The use of a standing desk for 75 minutes did not increase food consumption following a meal.

Josaphat and Mathieu are with the School of Kinesiology and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. Labonté-Lemoyne, Sénécal, and Léger are with Tech3lab, HEC Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada. Mathieu is also with the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center, Montréal, QC, Canada.

Mathieu (me.mathieu@umontreal.ca) is corresponding author.
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