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Background: Few adults in the United States obtain sufficient physical activity (PA) despite knowledge of the associated health benefits. The current feasibility study examined the feasibility of a novel modified sports intervention designed to promote enjoyment and sustained PA in sedentary adults. Methods: The US adults (N = 22, mean age 39.2 y, male/female percentage 54.5/45.5) in Central Pennsylvania participated in the PlayFit sports program for 60-minute sessions, 2 to 3 times per week, over the course of 10 weeks and 24 game sessions; completing 198 person sessions collectively. Primary outcomes were PA (accelerometry) and intervention satisfaction. Results: Percentage of time in moderate to vigorous activity ranged from 35.0% (volleyball) to 91.2% (ultimate frisbee). Percentage of time spent in vigorous activity ranged from 0.0% (volleyball) to 29.5% (team handball). Satisfaction, based on a 10-point scale with 10 being the most satisfied, ranged from 7.7 (kickball) to 8.7 (floor hockey and soccer). On average, all sports were rated highly, with the majority rated >8.5 and one rated <8.0. Percentage of time spent in the moderate to vigorous range was lower in men than in women (73.2% vs 80.0%, P = .01), but did not differ by age or body mass index. Conclusions: PlayFit is a promising first step in exploring the potential of modified sports programs to enhance population PA levels.

Upham, Auer, Sciamanna, Kraschnewski, Rovniak, Kearcher, Vizzini, and Cesarone are with the Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA. Mowen is with the Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Management, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. Smyth is with the Department of Biobehavioral Health, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. Conroy is with the Department of Kinesiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. Silvis is with the Department of Family and Community Medicine, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA. Lehman is with the Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.

Auer (bauer@pennstatehealth.psu.edu) is corresponding author.
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