Compliance With 24-Hour Movement Guidelines in Hong Kong Adolescents: Associations With Weight Status

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: This study examined the compliance with the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines among Hong Kong adolescents and its associations with body mass index (BMI). Methods: A total of 1039 adolescents (11–18 y) wore the activPAL™ for 24 hours for 7 consecutive days to assess physical activity (PA) and sleep duration. Screen time was measured using the Children’s Leisure Activities Study Survey (Chinese version). Linear mixed models were performed for analysis. Results: The analytic sample consisted of 692 adolescents (53% girls). Only 1.0% of the adolescents met all of the recommendations. The proportions of adolescents who met the recommendation for PA, screen time, and sleep were 9.1%, 31.2%, and 38.6%, respectively. Adolescent boys who did not meet the PA recommendation (β = 3.36; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.68; P = .001) and those who did not meet the combination of PA and sleep recommendations (β = 2.10, 95% CI, 0.64 to 3.56; P = .01) had a higher body mass index than those who met the respective recommendations. Conclusions: Compliance with the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines was alarmingly low among Hong Kong adolescents. Meeting the PA recommendation or the combination of PA and sleep recommendations was associated with a healthier body weight in boys.

Shi, Sit, and Wong are with the Department of Sports Science and Physical Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong. Huang is with the Department of Sport and Physical Education, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong.

Wong (hsswong@cuhk.edu.hk) is corresponding author.
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