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Background: Urban trails are a useful resource to promote physical activity. This study identified features of urban trails that correlated with trail use. Methods: Multiuse urban trails were selected in Chicago, Dallas, and Los Angeles. An audit of each trail was completed using the Systematic Pedestrian and Cyclist Environmental Scan for Trails instrument, identifying built environmental features. A self-report of trail use was obtained from trailside residents (N = 331) living within 1 mile of each trail. Univariate and multivariate Poisson regressions controlled for trail time from home and motivation for physical activity. Results: Positive associations with the past month’s hours on the trail were observed for the presence of distance signs, vegetation height, vegetation maintenance, and trail crowding, and a negative association was observed for the presence of crossings on the trail. Positive associations with dichotomous trail use were observed for the presence of distance signs, vegetation height, and vegetation maintenance, and a negative association was observed for the presence of crossings on the trail. Conclusions: These correlates should be confirmed in other studies and, if supported, should be considered in the promotion and design of urban trails.

Johansen, Reynolds, and Boyle are with the School of Community and Global Health, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA, USA. Wolch is with the Department of City and Regional Planning, College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. Byrne is with the Discipline of Geography and Spatial Sciences, School of Technology, Environments and Design, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Chou is with the Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Boyle is also with the School of Behavioral and Organizational Sciences, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA, USA. Spruijt-Metz is with the Department of Preventive Medicine, Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Economic and Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Lienemann is with Moores Cancer Center, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. Weaver is with the Weaver Research and Consulting Group, Ojai, CA, USA. Jerrett is with the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Johansen (christopher.johansen@cgu.edu) is corresponding author.
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