Reducing Anxiety and Anxiety Sensitivity With High-Intensity Interval Training in Adults With Asthma

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: Low- and moderate-intensity exercise training has been shown to be effective for reducing general anxiety and anxiety sensitivity among adults with asthma. Exercise frequency and intensity have been shown to play an integral role in reducing anxiety sensitivity; however, less is known about the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on anxiety in adults with asthma. Methods: A 6-week HIIT intervention was conducted with adults with asthma. Participants completed HIIT (10% peak power output for 1 min, 90% peak power output for 1 min, repeated 10 times) 3 times per week on a cycle ergometer. Preintervention and postintervention assessments included the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 and the Body Sensations Questionnaire. Results: Total Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (PRE: 17.9 [11.8]; POST 12.4 [13], P = .002, Cohen d = 0.4, n = 20) and Body Sensations Questionnaire (PRE: 2.4 [1.0]; POST: 2.0 [0.8], P = .007, Cohen d = 0.3) improved from preintervention to postintervention. Conclusion: A 6-week HIIT intervention leads to improved anxiety among adults with asthma. Future research should determine the impact of HIIT among adults with asthma with clinical anxiety.

O’Neill is with the Department of Applied Bioscience, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada. Dogra is with the Department of Kinesiology, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada.

O’Neill (carley.oneill@ontariotechu.net) is corresponding author.
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