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Background: Total sedentary time and prolonged sedentary patterns can negatively impact health. This study investigated rates of various sedentary pattern variables in Hispanic/Latino youth. Methods: Participants were 956 youths (50.9% female) in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Youth, a population-based cohort study of Hispanic/Latino 8- to 16-year-olds from 4 geographic regions in the United States (2012–2014). Total sedentary time and 10 sedentary pattern variables were measured through 1 week of accelerometer wear. Differences were examined by sociodemographic characteristics, geographic location, weekdays versus weekends, and season. Results: On average, youth were sedentary during 67.3% of their accelerometer wear time, spent 24.2% engaged in 10- to 29-minute sedentary bouts, and 7.2% in ≥60-minute bouts. 8- to 12-year-olds had more favorable sedentary patterns (less time in extended bouts and more breaks) than 13- to 16-year-olds across all sedentary variables. Sedentary patterns also differed by Hispanic/Latino background, with few differences across sex, household income, season, and place of birth, and none between weekdays versus weekends. Conclusions: Variables representing prolonged sedentary time were high among Hispanic/Latino youth. Adolescents in this group appear to be at especially high risk for unhealthy sedentary patterns. Population-based efforts are needed to prevent youth from engaging in increasingly prolonged sedentary patterns.

Bejarano is with the Clinical Child Psychology Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA. Bejarano and Carlson are with the Center for Healthy Lifestyles & Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA; and the Department of Pediatrics, University of Missouri Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA. Gallo and Castañeda are with the Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA. Garcia is with the Department of Health Science, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, USA. Sotres-Alvarez and Cai are with the Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Perreira is with the Department of Social Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Isasi is with the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Daviglus is with the Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Van Horn is with the Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. Delamater is with the Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. Savin is with the San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, CA, USA.

Carlson (jacarlson@cmh.edu) is corresponding author.
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