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“Replanning” a Statewide Walking Program Through the Iterative Use of the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance Framework

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: Interventions undergo adaptations when moving from efficacy to effectiveness trials. What happens beyond these initial steps—that is, when the “research” is over—is often unknown. The degree to which implementation quality remains high and impacts remain robust is underreported as these data are often less valued by community entities. Comprehensive and iterative evaluation is recommended to ensure robust outcomes over time. Methods: The reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance framework was used within an assess, plan, do, evaluate, report process to determine the degree to which a statewide physical activity promotion program aligned with evidence-based core components, assess who was reached and impacts on physical activity behaviors, and make decisions for future iterations. Results: Walk Across Arkansas was adopted by a majority of delivery agents and was effective at increasing physical activity levels postprogram, but those effects were not maintained after 6 months. Future decisions included recruitment strategies to reach a more diverse population and a blueprint document to reduce program drift. Conclusions: This article details the process of “replanning” a community-based physical activity intervention to understand public health impact and make decisions for future iterations. Pragmatic reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance questions were useful throughout the assess, plan, do, evaluate, report process.

Balis is with the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Louisville Center, Louisville, KY, USA. Harden is with the Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA.

Balis (lbalis@pire.org) is corresponding author.
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