Intensity of Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Dimensions of Mental Well-Being: A Reciprocal Approach Using Parallel Latent Growth Curve Modeling

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: The examination of the longitudinal effect of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) on mental well-being is important, but previous studies have typically been limited by their use of a cross-sectional approach. This study empirically examined how LTPA intensity was associated with changes in distinct functions of mental well-being (eg, emotional, psychological, social) over time, and vice versa. Methods: Parallel latent growth curve modeling in combination with propensity score matching analysis was conducted. Data were derived from a sample of adults from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study. Results: The results showed that the initial level of moderate LTPA at the baseline was associated with growth in psychological and social functioning over time, and vice versa. However, vigorous LTPA at the baseline was related only to growth in emotional functioning over time. Conclusion: The longitudinal association between LTPA and mental well-being had different matching mechanisms for LTPA intensities and their relation to distinct functioning for mental well-being. The findings contribute to an enhanced understanding of LTPA’s longitudinal effect on mental well-being.

C. Kim is with the Department of Sport Management, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. J. Kim is with the Department of Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. Thapa is with the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA.

Changwook Kim (firstace777@ufl.edu) is corresponding author.
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