Effect of Acute Exercise and Cycling Desk on Energy Intake and Appetite Response to Mental Work: The CORTEX Study

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: While mental work has been shown to favor overconsumption, the present study compared the effect of a cognitive task alone, followed by acute exercise, or performed on a cycling desk, on short-term food intake and appetite in adults. Methods: A total of 19 normal-weight adults randomly completed: resting session (CON), 30-minute cognitive task (CT), 30-minute cognitive task followed by a 15-minute high-intensity interval exercise bout (CT–EX), and 30-minute cognitive task performed on a cycling desk (CT-CD). Energy expenditure was estimated (heart rate–workload relationship), and energy intake (EI; ad libitum) and appetite (visual analog scales) were assessed. Results: Energy expenditure was higher in CT-EX (P < .001) compared with the other conditions and in CT-CD compared with CON and CT (P < .01). EI was higher in CON (P < .05) and CT-CD compared with CT (P < .01). Relative EI was higher in CON compared with CT (P < .05) and lower in CT-EX compared with CT, CT-CD, and CON (all Ps < .001). Area under the curve desire to eat was higher in CON compared with CT (P < .05) and CT-EX (P < .01). Area under the curve prospective food consumption was higher in CON compared with CT-EX (P < .01). Overall composite appetite score was not different between conditions. Conclusion: While cycling desks are recommended to break up sedentary time, the induced increase in energy expenditure might not be enough to significantly reduce overall short-term relative EI after mental work.

Thivel, Genin, Fillon, Khammassi, Roche, and Metz are with the Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P), Clermont Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Thivel and Metz are with the CRNH Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Thivel, Beaulieu, and Finlayson are with the Appetite Control and Energy Balance Research Group, School of Psychology, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom. Fillon and Duclos are with the INRA, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Fillon is also with the UGECAM Nutrition Obesity Ambulatory Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Pereira is with the University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, Biostatistics Unit (DRCI), Clermont-Ferrand, France. Thivel, Genin, and Duclos are also with the French National Observatory for Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors (ONAPS), Clermont-Ferrand, France. Fillon and Duclos are also with UFR Medicine, University Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Duclos is also with the Department of Sport Medicine and Functional Explorations, University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, G. Montpied Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Tremblay is with the Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods (INAF), Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada; and the School of Kinesiology and Physical Activity Sciences, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, QC, Canada. Chaput is with the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Thivel (David.Thivel@univ-bpclermont.fr) is corresponding author.
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