Impact of Flexible Work Arrangements, Self-Efficacy, and Barriers on Daily Physical Activity Among University Staff

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: Little is known about the link between flexible work arrangements and health behaviors, such as physical activity. This study aimed to explore how self-efficacy and daily barriers to physical activity influence daily levels of physical activity on workdays when university staff members used a flexible work arrangement (flextime or telework). Methods: Full-time university staff employees (N = 61, mean age = 41; 89% female) participated in this daily diary study. Participants completed an initial survey followed by daily surveys over the course of one workweek, resulting in 281 diary days. Results: The most frequently reported barriers to physical activity were as follows: lack of time, feeling tired, and not enough motivation. Multilevel models revealed that as the number of barriers increased, minutes of physical activity significantly decreased. Self-efficacy was not significantly related to daily physical activity. Participants reported fewer minutes of physical activity on flextime workdays compared to days when a flexible work arrangement was not used (ie, traditional workday). Daily use of a flexible work arrangement did not moderate the association between barriers and physical activity. Conclusions: This study illustrated the influence of daily barriers and flextime workdays on physical activity levels, which can inform workplace health programs for university staff.

Borowski and Savla are with the Department of Human Development and Family Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA. Zvonkovic is with the College of Health and Human Performance, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA.

Borowski (shelby6@vt.edu; Shelby.borowski@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
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