Social Cognitive and Ecological Factors Influence Physical Activity Among Thai Adolescents

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
View More View Less
Restricted access

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the intrapersonal, social, and physical environmental factors associated with physical activity (PA) practice in Thai adolescents. Methods: A total of 5536 adolescents aged 14–17 years participated in the survey. Confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modeling were conducted to determine associations between intrapersonal, social, and physical environmental factors with PA. Results: The mean age of participants was 15.50 (1.12) years. Community environment had an overall effect on PA (β = 0.08). Perceived family support had direct (β = −0.14) and indirect (β = 0.17) effects on PA through perceived barriers (β = 0.14). Perceived barriers were directly related to PA (β = −0.23) and indirectly (β = −0.16) related to PA through self-efficacy (β = −0.14) and through perceived benefits and self-efficacy (β = −0.02). Perceived usefulness was indirectly related to PA through self-efficacy (β = 0.07). Self-efficacy was directly related to PA (β = 0.43). Girls were more likely to report more perceived barriers (βtotal = 0.13). The model explained 45% of the variance in PA. Conclusion: Self-efficacy and perceived barriers are important intrapersonal factors, whereas perceived family support is an important interpersonal factor for PA among Thai adolescents.

Sriramatr is with the Department of Sports Science, Faculty of Physical Education, Srinakharinwirot University, NakhonNayok, Thailand. Maphong is with the Faculty of Sports Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Maphong (aroma_1111@hotmail.com) is corresponding author.
  • 1.

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee. 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Scientific Report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2018. https://health.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/PAG_Advisory_Committee_Report.pdf.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    NHS. Physical activity guidelines for children and young people. https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/physical-activity-guidelines-children-and-young-people/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    World Health Organization. Physical activity. 2020. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/physical-activity. Accessed January 2, 2021.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Ghandour RM, Jones JR, Lebrun-Harris LA, et al. The design and implementation of the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health. Matern Child Health J. 2018;22(8):10931102. PubMed ID: 29744710 doi:10.1007/s10995-018-2526-x

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Amornsriwatanakul A, Lester L, Bull FC, Rosenberg M. Are Thai children and youth sufficiently active? Prevalence and correlates of physical activity from a nationally representative cross-sectional study. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017;14(1):19. doi:10.1186/s12966-017-0529-4

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Tonge KL, Jones RA, Okely AD. Correlates of children’s objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior in early childhood education and care services: a systematic review. Prev Med. 2016;89:129139. PubMed ID: 27235604 doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.05.019

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Sallis J, Owen N. Health behavior: Theory, research, and practice. In: Glanz K, Rimer B, Viswanath K, eds. Ecological Models of Health Behavior. 5th ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass; 2015.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Bauman AE, Reis RS, Sallis JF, et al. Correlates of physical activity: why are some people physically active and others not? Lancet. 2012;380(9838):258271. PubMed ID: 22818938 doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60735-1

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Bronfenbrenner U. The Ecology of Human Development: Experiments by Nature and Design. Harvard University Press; 1979.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Rhodes RE, McEwan D, Rebar AL. Theories of physical activity behaviour change: a history and synthesis of approaches. Psychol Sport Exerc. 2019;42:100109. doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2018.11.010

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Biddle SJ, Nigg CR. Theories of exercise behavior. Int J Sport Psychol. 2000;31(2):290304.

  • 12.

    Head KJ, Noar SM. Facilitating progress in health behaviour theory development and modification: the reasoned action approach as a case study. Health Psychol Rev. 2014;8(1):3452. PubMed ID: 25053006 doi:10.1080/17437199.2013.778165

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Bandura A. Social Foundations of Thought and Action. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall; 1986:2328.

  • 14.

    Bandura A. Health promotion by social cognitive means. Health Educ Behav. 2004;31(2):143164. PubMed ID: 15090118 doi:10.1177/1090198104263660

  • 15.

    Lee J, Hoornbeek J, Oh N. Social cognitive orientations, social support, and physical activity among at-risk urban children: insights from a structural equation model. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020;17(18):6745. doi:10.3390/ijerph17186745

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    McLeroy KR, Bibeau D, Steckler A, Glanz K. An ecological perspective on health promotion programs. Health Educ Q. 1988;15(4):351377. PubMed ID: 3068205 doi:10.1177/109019818801500401

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Kemp BJ, Cliff DP, Batterham M, Parrish AM. Socio-ecological predictors of non-organized physical activity participation and decline between childhood and adolescence. J Sports Sci. 2021;39(2):120130. PubMed ID: 32795168 doi:10.1080/02640414.2020.1808296

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Simon C, Kellou N, Dugas J, et al. A socio-ecological approach promoting physical activity and limiting sedentary behavior in adolescence showed weight benefits maintained 2.5 years after intervention cessation. Int J Obes. 2014;38(7):936943. doi:10.1038/ijo.2014.23

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Yeung O, Johnston K. The Physical Activity Economy in Asia: Market Size, Participation, Barriers, and Options to Increase Movement. https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/institutional-document/633886/adou2020bp-physical-activityeconomy-asia.pdf

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Amornsriwatanakul A, Nakornkhet K, Katewongsa P, et al. Results from Thailand’s 2016 report card on physical activity for children and youth. J Phys Act Health. 2016;13(11, suppl 2):S291S298. doi:10.1123/jpah.2016-0316

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Lam CB, McHale SM. Developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity. J Fam Psychol. 2015;29(1):100. PubMed ID: 25485671 doi:10.1037/fam0000049

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Hands B, Parker H, Glasson C, Brinkman S, Read H. Results of Western Australian Child and Adolescent Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey 2003 (CAPANS): Physical Activity Technical Report. Perth, Western Australia: Government of Western Australia. 2004.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    Martin K, Rosenberg M, Miller M, et al. Child and Adolescent Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey 2008: Key Findings. Perth, Australia: Western Australian Government; 2009.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24.

    Telford A, Salmon J, Jolley D, Crawford D. Reliability and validity of physical activity questionnaires for children: the Children’s Leisure Activities Study Survey (CLASS). Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2004;16(1):6478. doi:10.1123/pes.16.1.64

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Napolitano MA, Papandonatos GD, Lewis BA, et al. Mediators of physical activity behavior change: a multivariate approach. Health Psychol. 2008;27(4):409. PubMed ID: 18642998 doi:10.1037/0278-6133.27.4.409

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    Brown TA. Confirmatory Factor Analysis for Applied Research. New York, NY: Guilford Publications; 2015.

  • 27.

    Martens MP. Future directions of structural equation modeling in counseling psychology. Couns Psychol. 2005;33(3):375382. doi:10.1177/0011000005274598

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28.

    Kline RB. Principles and Practice of Structural Equation Modeling. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Guilford; 2005.

  • 29.

    Bentler PM, Bonett DG. Significance tests and goodness of fit in the analysis of covariance structures. Psychol Bull. 1980;88(3):588. doi:10.1037/0033-2909.88.3.588

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 30.

    Petosa RL, Smith L. Social cognitive theory and accelerometer assessed physical activity among adolescents living in rural Appalachia. Am J Health Educ. 2020;51(2):7277. doi:10.1080/19325037.2020.1713262

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 31.

    Rhodes RE, Zhang R, Zhang C-Q. Direct and indirect relationships between the built environment and individual-level perceptions of physical activity: a systematic review. Ann Behav Med. 2020;54(7):495509. PubMed ID: 31926006 doi:10.1093/abm/kaz068

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32.

    Haughton McNeill L, Wyrwich KW, Brownson RC, Clark EM, Kreuter MW. Individual, social environmental, and physical environmental influences on physical activity among black and white adults: a structural equation analysis. Ann Behav Med. 2006;31(1):3644. doi:10.1207/s15324796abm3101_7

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 33.

    Ayotte BJ, Margrett JA, Hicks-Patrick J. Physical activity in middle-aged and young-old adults: the roles of self-efficacy, barriers, outcome expectancies, self-regulatory behaviors and social support. J Health Psychol. 2010;15(2):173185. PubMed ID: 20207661 doi:10.1177/1359105309342283

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 34.

    Orbell S, Szczepura A, Weller D, Gumber A, Hagger MS. South Asian ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and psychological mediators of faecal occult blood colorectal screening participation: a prospective test of a process model. Health Psychol. 2017;36(12):1161. PubMed ID: 28726477 doi:10.1037/hea0000525

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 35.

    Lee J, Hoornbeek J, Oh N, Hallam JS. Can students be motivated to exercise through physical education class learning strategies? A multilevel analysis. Health Behav Policy Rev. 2019;6(3):264275. doi:10.14485/HBPR.6.3.6

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 36.

    Liu Y, Zhang Y, Chen S, Zhang J, Guo Z, Chen P. Associations between parental support for physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among Chinese school children: a cross-sectional study. J Sport Health Sci. 2017;6(4):410415. PubMed ID: 30356620 doi:10.1016/j.jshs.2017.09.008

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 37.

    McEachan R, Taylor N, Harrison R, Lawton R, Gardner P, Conner M. Meta-analysis of the reasoned action approach (RAA) to understanding health behaviors. Ann Behav Med. 2016;50(4):592612. PubMed ID: 27169555 doi:10.1007/s12160-016-9798-4

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 38.

    Saonuam P, Rasri N, Pongpradit K, Widyastari DA, Katewongsa P. Results from Thailand’s 2018 report card on physical activity for children and youth. J Phys Act Health. 2018;15(suppl):S417S418. doi:10.1123/jpah.2018-0465

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 39.

    Aliss EM, Sutaih RH, Kamfar HZ, Alagha AE, Marzouki ZM. Physical activity pattern and its relationship with overweight and obesity in Saudi children. Int J Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2020;7(4):181185. PubMed ID: 33319016 doi:10.1016/j.ijpam.2020.03.007

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 40.

    Riddoch CJ, Andersen LB, Wedderkopp N, et al. Physical activity levels and patterns of 9-and 15-yr-old European children. Med Sci Sports Exercise. 2004;36(1):8692. doi:10.1249/01.MSS.0000106174.43932.92

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 41.

    Charoenwanit S. The relationship of cyber-bullying and academic achievement, general health, and depression in adolescents in Thailand. Walailak J Sci Technol. 2019;16(4):231241. doi:10.48048/wjst.2019.4059

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 42.

    Laeheem K. Factors associated with bullying behavior in Islamic private schools, Pattani province, southern Thailand. Asian Soc Sci. 2013;9(3):55. doi:10.5539/ass.v9n3p55

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 43.

    Lertpheantum C, Piyaraj P. Prevalence and associated factors of traditional bully among population-based sample of secondary school students in rural community, Thailand. Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2018;66:S406. doi:10.1016/j.respe.2018.05.462

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1095 1095 373
Full Text Views 353 353 7
PDF Downloads 208 208 5