Changes in 24-Hour Domain-Specific Movement Behaviors and Their Associations With Children’s Psychosocial Health During the Transition From Primary to Secondary School: A Compositional Data Analysis

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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  • 1 Early Start, Faculty of the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
  • | 2 School of Health and Society, Faculty of the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
  • | 3 Allied Health and Human Performance, Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia
  • | 4 Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Parkville, VIC, Australia
  • | 5 School of Education, Faculty of the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
  • | 6 Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
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Background: Little is known about the influence of 24-hour movement behaviors on children’s psychosocial health when transitioning from primary to secondary school. This study described changes in 24-hour domain-specific movement behavior composition and explored their associations with changes in psychosocial health during this transition. Methods: Data were drawn from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The analytical sample (n = 909) included children who were enrolled in primary school at baseline (2010) and in secondary school at follow-up (2012). Time spent in 8 domains of movement behaviors was derived from the child-completed time-use diaries. Psychosocial health was examined using the self-report version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires. Analyses included repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance and compositional regression. Results: Children reported engaging in more social activities and sleeping less over the transition period. Increased time spent in social activities (βilr = −0.06, P = .014) and recreational screen use (βilr = −0.17, P = .003) (relative to other domains) were associated with decreased prosocial behavior in boys. Changes in movement behavior composition were not associated with changes in girls’ psychosocial health. Conclusion: This study found considerable changes in children’s 24-hour movement behavior composition, but a lack of consistent association with changes in psychosocial health during the primary to secondary school transition.

Chong (khc745@uowmail.edu.au) is corresponding author.

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