24-Hour Movement Behaviors Among US Adults With Functional Disabilities

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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  • 1 Coaching and Teaching Studies, College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA
  • | 2 Health and Physical Education, Department of Human Movement Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA
  • | 3 Center for Leadership in Disability, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA
  • | 4 Community Health Academic Group, School of Nursing, Psychotherapy and Community Health Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland
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This study aimed to quantify and compare physical activity, sitting time, and sleep behaviors among US adults with and without disabilities using the 2020 Canadian 24-hour movement framework. The weighted prevalence of 24-hour movement guideline adherence was estimated among a nationally representative sample from the 2017 to 2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of US adults (18–65 years old) with (n = 1070) and without (n = 33,370) functional disabilities in vision, hearing, mobility, cognitive, and self-care domains. The adjusted odds of single and combination guideline compliance were estimated by disability type, in reference to adults without disabilities, using separate multivariable logistic regressions. After adjusting for age, sex, and income, adults with disabilities in mobility, cognitive, or self-care domains had approximately half the odds of meeting all 3 guidelines, compared with adults without disabilities (adjusted odds range: 0.49–0.77). Significantly lower adherence was observed among adults with functional disabilities, compared with no disabilities, for sleep, and moderate to vigorous physical activity, but not sedentary guidelines. This report establishes baseline prevalence estimates for guidelines compliance among US adults with functional disabilities ages 18–65 years old. Low guideline adherence, and evidence for significant differences in physical activity and sleep, signals a need to further explore combination health behaviors among adults with disabilities.

Ross (samantha.ross2@mail.wvu.edu) is corresponding author.

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