Supervised Aerobic Exercise Training and Increased Lifestyle Physical Activity to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk for Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health

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Amie WoodwardLifestyle, Exercise and Nutrition Improvement (LENI) Research Group, College of Health, Wellbeing and Life Sciences, Sheffield Hallam University, Collegiate Campus, Sheffield, United Kingdom

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David BroomCentre for Sport, Exercise and Life Sciences, Health and Wellbeing Research Institute, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom

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Caroline DaltonBiomolecular Sciences Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, United Kingdom

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Mostafa MetwallyJessop Wing, Sheffield, United Kingdom

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Markos KlonizakisLifestyle, Exercise and Nutrition Improvement (LENI) Research Group, College of Health, Wellbeing and Life Sciences, Sheffield Hallam University, Collegiate Campus, Sheffield, United Kingdom

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Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex, heterogeneous endocrinopathy. Women with PCOS often present with cardiovascular disease risk factors. Physical activity (PA) interventions reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors in women with PCOS. However, sedentary behaviors have a distinct deleterious effect on cardiometabolic health. Increasing PA and reducing sedentary behaviors may be a worthwhile therapeutic target to improve cardiovascular health in this population. This study investigated the feasibility of 2 PA interventions to decrease cardiovascular disease risk in women with PCOS. Methods: This was a feasibility randomized controlled trial of 2 PA interventions in 36 women with PCOS. Participants were randomized to a supervised exercise intervention (n = 12), a lifestyle physical activity group intervention aimed at reducing sedentary behaviors (n = 12), or a control group (n = 12), for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes included the feasibility and acceptability of the interventions and procedures. Results: Recruitment rate was 56%. Adherence rate was 53% and 100% to the exercise intervention and lifestyle PA intervention, respectively. Secondary outcome data indicate a reduction in oxidized low-density lipoprotein concentrations in the exercise group, and weight loss in both intervention groups. Conclusions: The procedures for recruitment, allocation, and outcome measurements were acceptable. However, before progression to a full-scale trial, adherence to the exercise program should be addressed.

Woodward (amie.woodward@york.ac.uk) is corresponding author.

Amie Woodward is now at the York Trials Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Heslington, York, United Kingdom.

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