Associated Factors of Time Spent Walking for Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors

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Young-Ah Choi Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Incheon St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea

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Jung Soo Lee Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea

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Yeo Hyung Kim Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Uijeongbu St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea

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Background: This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with the time that community-dwelling stroke survivors spent walking. Methods: We analyzed the cross-sectional data of 1534 community-dwelling stroke survivors from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Complex-sample logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the factors associated with insufficient walking time (<90 min/wk). The mean time spent walking was examined according to age, sex, resistance exercise level, and self-reported disability using complex-sample general linear models. Results: Women (odds ratio [OR] 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0–2.3), current smokers (OR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1–2.8), insufficient resistance exercise (OR 2.3; 95% CI, 1.5–3.5), and those with rural residences (OR 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0–1.9) were independently associated with insufficient walking time. The mean time spent walking was significantly lower in older adults aged ≥65 years than in young adults aged <65 years (200.0 ± 42.0 min/wk vs 287.2 ± 36.6 min/wk, P = .002), in women than in men (200.9 ± 44.9 vs 286.2 ± 37.7 min/wk, P = .027), and in individuals engaging in insufficient resistance exercise compared with those engaging in sufficient resistance exercise (203.2 ± 36.2 vs 283.9 ± 43.0 min/wk, P = .008). The mean walking time did not vary according to the presence of self-reported disabilities. Conclusions: Environmental and personal factors are associated with insufficient walking time in community-dwelling stroke survivors.

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