Perceived Individual, Social, and Environmental Factors for Physical Activity and Walking

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

Few studies have explored associations of individual, social, and environmental factors with physical activity and walking behavior.

Methods:

A random-digit-dial questionnaire, which included selected individual, social, and environmental variables, was administered to 2025 adults, age 18 y and older, in two adjacent counties in a southeastern state. Logistic regressions were conducted adjusting for age, race, sex, education, and employment.

Results:

In multivariate models, somewhat different variables were associated with physical activity versus regular walking. Self-efficacy (OR = 19.19), having an exercise partner (OR = 1.47), recreation facilities (OR = 1.54), and safety of trails from crime (OR = 0.72) were associated with physical activity level; while self-efficacy (OR = 4.22), known walking routes (OR = 1.54), recreation facilities (OR = 1.57-1.59), and safety of trails from crime (OR = 0.69) were associated with regular walking behavior.

Conclusions:

Physical activity and walking behaviors were associated with similar variables in this study.

Granner is with the School of Public Health, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557. Sharpe, Hutto, Wilcox, and Addy are with the Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.