Health Related Quality of Life by Level of Physical Activity in Arthritic Older Adults With and Without Activity Limitations

Click name to view affiliation

Julie Freelove-Charton
Search for other papers by Julie Freelove-Charton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Heather R Bowles
Search for other papers by Heather R Bowles in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Steven Hooker
Search for other papers by Steven Hooker in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Background:

This study examined the association between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and physical activity (PA) among adults with arthritis.

Methods:

National 2003 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey data for 51,444 adults, age ≥50 y, with physician-diagnosed arthritis were used to analyze the relationships between PA, self-reported health, HRQOL, and activity limitations related to arthritis.

Results:

The percentage of older adults with or without an activity limitation who reported fair/poor health or poor HRQOL was significantly higher in inactive persons compared to those who met PA recommendations (p < .0001). Older adults with and without limitations attaining either recommended or insufficient levels of PA were 39% to 70% less likely to report ≥14 unhealthy mental or physical days compared to inactive older adults (p < .0001).

Conclusion:

Participation in PA at the recommended level was strongly associated with improved perceived health and higher levels of HRQOL; however, participation in some PA was clearly better than being inactive. These data were consistent for persons with arthritis despite the presence of an activity limitation.

Freelove-Charton is with the Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Bowles is with the Centre for Physical Activity and Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, AU; Hooker is with the Prevention Research Center and the Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

  • Collapse
  • Expand
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1609 31 0
Full Text Views 23 13 0
PDF Downloads 20 4 0