An Evidence-Based Exercise Program Implemented in Congregate-Meal Sites

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

This study examined the feasibility of implementing the EnhanceFitness Program (formerly Lifetime Fitness Program), an evidence-based exercise program, at congregate-meal sites that generally serve low-income older adults.

Methods:

A 12-week aerobic and strength training exercise program was held at senior centers 3 times a week.

Results:

The mean age of the 31 participants was 73.5 years ± 6.7 years (60–86). Participants’ compliance with attending the exercise class was 74%. Paired t tests were used to evaluate change after the intervention. Three out of six components of the Senior Fitness Test increased significantly after the exercise intervention (P < .003). Three out of the eight self-reported health concepts of the SF-36 demonstrated significant improvement after the exercise intervention (P < .003).

Conclusion:

These data indicate that an evidence-based exercise program can be successfully implemented in this population.

Moore-Harrison is with the Dept of Kinesiology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, NC 28223. Johnson is with the Dept of Foods and Nutrition, and Cress the Dept of Kinesiology and Institute of Gerontology, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602. Quinn is with the Medical College of Georgia, School of Nursing at Athens, GA 30605.