Associations Between Intrapersonal and Neighborhood Environmental Characteristics and Cycling for Transport and Recreation in Adults: Baseline Results From the RESIDE Study

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

This study investigated the relationship between individual and neighborhood environmental factors and cycling for transport and for recreation among adults living in Perth, Western Australia.

Methods:

Baseline cross-sectional data from 1813 participants (40.5% male; age range 18 to 78 years) in the RESIDential Environment (RESIDE) project were analyzed. The questionnaire included information on cycling behavior and on cycling-specific individual, social environmental, and neighborhood environmental attributes. Cycling for transport and recreation were dichotomized as whether or not individuals cycled in a usual week.

Results:

Among the individual factors, positive attitudes toward cycling and perceived behavioral control increased the odds of cycling for transport and for recreation. Among the neighborhood environmental attributes, leafy and attractive neighborhoods, access to bicycle/walking paths, the presence of traffic slowing devices and having many 4-way street intersections were positively associated with cycling for transport. Many alternative routes in the local area increased the odds of cycling for recreation.

Conclusions:

Effective strategies for increasing cycling (particularly cycling for transport) may include incorporating supportive environments such as creating leafy and attractive neighborhood surroundings, low traffic speed, and increased street connectivity, in addition to campaigns aimed at strengthening positive attitudes and confidence to cycle.

Titze is with the Dept of Physical Activity and Health, Institute of Sport Science, Graz, Austria. Giles-Corti is with the Centre for the Built Environment and Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Knuiman, Pikora, and Bull are with the School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Timperio is with the Centre for Physical Activity & Nutrition Research, Deakin University, Burwood, Australia. van Niel is with the School of Earth and Geographical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.