Pre-Diabetes Detection and Intervention for High Risk Communities

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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This article briefly summarizes the “Pre-Diabetes Detection and Intervention Symposium” that described ongoing and past pre-diabetes interventions, and outlined some considerations when deciding to target specific populations with pre-diabetes. The success of type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevention clinical trials provides clear evidence that healthy lifestyle change can prevent the development of T2D in a cost effective manner in high risk individuals. However, who to target and what cut-points should be used to identify individuals who would qualify for these T2D prevention programs are not simple questions. More stringent cut-offs are more efficient in preventing T2D, but less equitable. Interventions will likely need to be adapted and made more economical for local communities and health care centers if they are to be adopted universally. Further, they may need to be adapted to meet the specific needs of certain high-risk populations such as ethnic minorities. The Chronic Disease Management & Prevention Program for Diverse Populations in Alberta and the Pre-diabetes Detection and Physical Activity Intervention Delivery project in Toronto represent 2 examples of specialized interventions that are targeted at certain high risk populations. To reverse the current T2D trends will require continued efforts to develop and refine T2D prevention interventions.

Kuk and Riddell are with the School of Kinesiology and Health Science, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Unit, York University, Toronto, Canada. Davachi is with Diverse Populations, Primary Care & Chronic Disease Management, Alberta Health Services. Kriska is with the Dept of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, and the Diabetes Prevention Support Center, Pittsburgh, PA. Gregg is with the Epidemiology and Statistics Branch, Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.