Correlates of Perceived Worksite Environmental Support for Physical Activity

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

The objective of this pilot study was to examine demographic, health, behavioral, and social cognitive correlates of perceived worksite environmental support for physical activity (PA) in middle-age adults.

Methods:

A convenience sample (N = 173) of University employees in the Southeastern U.S. (mean age = 45) was surveyed using an internet-based questionnaire. Measures included perceived worksite environmental support for PA, self-reported minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA, self-regulation, self-efficacy for walking transportation, PA social support, health status, and sociodemographic items. Bivariate and hierarchical regression analyses were computed to examine correlates of perceived worksite environmental support for PA.

Results:

Bivariate analyses revealed male gender, self-reported moderate-to-vigorous PA, self-regulation use, self-efficacy for walking transportation, and PA social support from friends and family as independent, positive correlates of perceived worksite environmental support for PA (P ≤ .05). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed self-regulation use and PA social support from friends as independent, positive correlates of perceived worksite environmental support for PA (final model R2 = 20.30%, P ≤ .0001).

Conclusions:

Although causality cannot be determined, these pilot findings support a social cognitive approach. Further exploration of these relationships is warranted and health educators should consider perceptions of physical and social environments in planning future worksite PA promotion programs.

Umstattd is with the Dept of Health, Human Performance, and Recreation, Baylor University, Waco, TX. Baller is with the Dept of Health Science, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL. Blunt is with the Dept of Health Sciences, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA. Darst is with the Dept of Health, Exercise, and Rehabilitative Sciences, Winona State University, Winona, MN. Umstattd, Baller, and Darst were at the Dept of Health Science, University of Alabama, during the data collection for this study.

Journal of Physical Activity and Health