The Short-Term Efficacy of a Brief Motivational Intervention Designed to Increase Physical Activity Among College Students

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

Research has shown that many college students do not meet recommended national guidelines for physical activity. The objective of this pilot study was to examine the short-term efficacy of a brief motivational intervention (BMI) designed to increase physical activity.

Methods:

Participants were 70 college students who reported low physical activity (83% women, 60% African American). Participants were randomly assigned to either the BMI condition or to an education-only (EO) condition. They completed measures of physical activity at baseline and 1-month follow-up.

Results:

Those in the BMI condition reported more vigorous-intensity physical activity at a 1-month follow-up than those in the EO condition.

Conclusions:

The findings from this study provide preliminary support for the efficacy of a BMI designed to increase physical activity among college students. Future studies should continue to examine and refine the intervention in an effort to improve health-related behaviors among this group.

Martens and Smith are with the Dept of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO. Buscemi and Murphy are with the Dept of Psychology, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN.