Exposure to Physical Activity Resources by Neighborhood Sociodemographic Characteristics in Copenhagen

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background:

To investigate socioeconomic patterning of physical activity resources in Copenhagen.

Methods:

We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the association between physical activity-supportive resources [public open space (POS), cycling and walking paths, sports facilities, and intersection density] and neighborhood sociodemographic indicators (low education, recent immigrants, children under 15 yr, and household income).

Results:

Neighborhoods with high proportions of residents with low education were most likely to have POS (OR = 2.63; CI: 2.10–3.29), paths (OR = 3.60; CI: 2.84–4.56) and sports facilities (OR = 5.96; CI: 4.31–8.24). Mid-to-low income areas were less likely to contain POS (OR = 67; CI: 0.49–0.90), paths (OR = 0.36; CI: 0.26–0.50), and sports facilities (OR = 0.48; CI: 0.30–0.77). Areas with children were less likely to have connected streets (OR = 0.51; CI: 0.31–0.83) but more likely to have POS (OR = 1.40; CI: 1.15–1.70) and paths (OR = 1.52; CI: 1.25–1.85).

Conclusions:

Residents living in areas with high proportions of low education or young children are likely to have high exposure to physical activity resources. Exposure to physical activity resources in Copenhagen may not explain the inequalities in physical activity behavior. Further examination of exposure to built environment resources is warranted.

Svastisalee, Hostein, and Due are with the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. Schipperijn is with the Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. Powell is with the Institute for Health Research and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago.