Associations Between Trajectories of Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Television Viewing Time Across Adulthood: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study

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Background: The purpose of this study was to examine trajectories of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and television-viewing (TV) time and their associations in adults over 10 years. Methods: The sample comprised 2934 participants (men, 46.0%) aged 24–39 years in 2001 and they were followed up for 10 years. LTPA and TV time were assessed using self-report questionnaires in 2001, 2007, and 2011. Longitudinal LTPA and TV-time trajectories and their interactions were analyzed with mixture modeling. Results: Three LTPA (persistently highly active, 15.8%; persistently moderately active, 60.8%; and persistently low active, 23.5%) and 4 TV time (consistently low, 38.6%; consistently moderate, 48.2%; consistently high, 11.7%; and consistently very high, 1.5%) trajectory classes were identified. Persistently highly active women had a lower probability of consistently high TV time than persistently low-active women (P = .02), whereas men who were persistently highly active had a higher probability of consistently moderate TV time and a lower probability of consistently low TV time than their persistently low-active counterparts (P = .03 and P = .01, respectively). Conclusions: Maintaining high LTPA levels were accompanied by less TV over time in women, but not in men. The associations were partially explained by education, body mass index, and smoking.

Yang and Lounassalo contributed equally to this work. Yang, Kankaanpää, and Tammelin are with the LIKES Research Centre for Physical Activity and Health, Jyväskylä, Finland. Lounassalo, Hirvensalo, Palomäki, and Salin are with the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. Rovio and Raitakari are with the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku and Department of Clinical Physiology, Turku, Finland; and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. Tolvanen is with the Methodology Center for Human Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. Biddle is with the Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield, QLD, Australia. Helajärvi is with the Departments of Physiology and Health and Physical Activity, Paavo Nurmi Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Hutri-Kähönen is with the Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.

Yang (xiaolin.yang@likes.fi) is corresponding author.
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